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Author Topic: Ivy In the woods  (Read 247 times)

Offline hokano

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Ivy In the woods
« on: September 13, 2017, 02:18:11 PM »
Here is a recording made earlier today in my local woods, of Ivy playing the Serum soft synth, I've mixed in a field recording of the general ambience to add to the feel of the piece https://soundcloud.com/andy-hokano/vale-1

Offline Nicola Alexandra Hajdu

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Re: Ivy In the woods
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 06:10:06 PM »
Your soundscape has a decent sound quality. I can tell the effort in the EQing process which excellently avoids otherwise harsh frequencies. That isn't always easy to find the golden optimum. Just by the way, the soundworld's hunting feel reminds me on Steve Roach's Spirit dome. Just out of curiosity, ...when did you capture this recording ? Was it at mornings, afternoons or just before sunset ?

Much Love
Nicola

Offline hokano

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Re: Ivy In the woods
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2017, 05:36:36 PM »
Hi Nicola
The recording was made mid afternoon, some of the sound variance was created by the clouds passing over the sun which caused the plant to slow down and then go yay in plant speak when the sun broke through again. I'll have to check out the Steve Roach piece I've not heard it.

Thanks for listening

H

Offline Nicola Alexandra Hajdu

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Re: Ivy In the woods
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2017, 08:08:45 AM »
Hi Hokano!

Your described experience reminds me on the research from Prof. Novoplansky, Dr.Suzanne Simard and Prof. Stefan Mancuso who basically say that plants are communicating with each other, are aware and able to make developmental decisions based on information they perceive from their environment and neighbors. And it also reminds me on my experiences in the Vienna woods, where the same tree had emitted different frequencies during the morning compared with afternoon. It may be possible that it also depends on the level of noise. In my case i had children playing around the tree while i tried to record it, while the afternoon was characterized by a calm atmosphere with less activity.





The tree is nearby a playground and the children and chirping birds brought up a positive vibration. :) So therefore it makes sense to me that plants do react on sudden changes. Another aspect is that all lifeforms on earth depend on Earth's Schumann Resonance. I guess Plants have mood swings like us, reacting on good and bad weather = spherics seasons and day/night conditions. Thus, different frequencies and consequently different music. :)

Much Love
Nicola
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 08:12:16 AM by Nicola Alexandra Hajdu »